Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Mohnkuchen

In class, we were supposed to create what is called a Produktpasse. This means, we were taught the correct way to present a product and production of the product. What was my product? Mohnkuchen, Mohn is German for poppy seeds. Poppy seeds in a cake? Yea, those of you in America think this is a little weird, and I've talked about this before, but it's extremely common here. Check out my Produktpasse, and maybe make yourself a little Mohnkuchen!



Mohnkuchen
2700g Teig für 78 x 58 cm Backblech
3500g Mohnfüllung
840g Streusel

Blechkuchen

1000g
Weizenmehl (550)
400g
Vollmilch
60g
Hefe
120g
Zucker
200g
Butter oder Backmargarine
150g
Vollei
10g
Salz
Zitronen- und Vanillearoma

Mohnfüllung

800g
Vollmilch
650g
Zucker
350g
Butter oder Margarine
1300g
Gemahlen Mohn
250g
Vollei
150g
Süß Brösel
Evtl. 100g
Sultaninen
Prise Salz
Vanillearome, Zimt

Streusel

240g
Zucker
240g
Butter
360g
Weizenmehl
Große Prise Salz
Zitronen- und Vanillearoma

  • Mehl Type 550
  • Teigtemperatur 26 C
  • Spiralkneter 2 Minuten langsam und 5 Minuten schnell
  • Teigruhe 15 Minuten
  • Den Teig abwiegen und rechteckig
  • Ca. 5 Minuten angären lassen, damit er ausrollfähig wird
  • Den Teig auf Blechgröße ausrollen
  • 3500g Mohnfüllung gleichmäßig auf den Teig bestreichen
  • 840g Streusel aufstreuen
  • Backen 210 C für 20 Minuten
  • Der Blechkuchen ist fertig gebacken, wenn er an der Unterseite hellbraun ist
  • Den ausgebackenen Blechkuchen auf ein Gitter
  • Den abgekühlten Mohnkuchen nach dem Backen leicht mit Puderzucker bestauben



UPDATE:
I will translate to English!

    28 comments:

    1. Since I am an editor I can say: almost perfect grammar ;-) Like your blog.

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    2. No offense but I liked the globe back ground better...

      Love your blog tho!

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    3. Wow not only does this look delicious, but I finally know the answer to a question I have been longing to answer!

      I took a trip to Europe in high school and had a fantastic cake made out of poppyseeds in Prague, I think. Anyway, I couldn't figure out what it was called, let alone replicate it.

      This looks like the closest thing to it, so thanks for sharing the recipe! Even though I can't read German :)

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    4. that does look delicious! I just ate dinner and now I wanna eat again lol...

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    5. I like the new background..did you make the pretzels, too???

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    6. I don't think baking with poppy seeds is weird at all! It looks fantastic.

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    7. I like the old background too.. Looks great!

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    8. Thanks for sharing the recipe for Mohnkuchen! When I lived in Bremerhaven in the early eighties I discovered it. I've only had it once since. I can't wait to try and make it myself.

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    9. I love the background change! It fits what you're doing!

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    10. Can't wait for the translation!! It looks wonderful :)

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    11. Yum! Love Mohnkuchen. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

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    12. Poppy seed cake is really that uncommon in America? That's just crazy.

      You put poppy seeds on other stuff - why not not cake? Or other pastries?

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    13. Können Sie auf Englisch übersetzen? Viele Leute kann kein Deutsch lesen oder verstehen. Danke.

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    14. What type of breadcrumbs and flour is used in the Mohnkuchen? Cake or all-purpose flour?

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    15. Anonymous: http://bakingthroughgermany.blogspot.com/2011/03/translated-poppy-seed-cake-aka.html here it is translated.
      Karen: you can use any bread crumbs, but preferably sweet i.e. left over cake crumbs. For the flour just your all-purpose flour will work!

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    16. I was at an Italian grocery in Santa Monica yesterday and found "cheap" poppy seeds. Immediately, I thought of the Mohnkucken that I used to eat and sell at the Uni Cafe when I lived in Würzburg, Germany as an exchange student. Your blog sounds really cool. I found it by Googling "Mohnkuchen". Kudos to your endeavor: two things Germans do very well are baking and career training outside of college. Tschüß, Bryan.

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    17. I'm a German living in Southern Florida and wonder where I could buy poppy seeds to make this Mohnkuchen. Anyone know? Would also grow it myself but can't order it from Germany because stores don't ship to the US.

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      Replies
      1. Hi Karl,

        I found the poppy seeds in an Italian grocery store in LA. It looks like the poppy seeds are "manufactured" by a company called Indo-European Foods, Inc., Glendale, CA 91201.

        I suspect that Indo-European foods is an Armenian producer (Glendale has a very large Armenian population). So, maybe you can find them at a Middle Eastern market or somewhere with a bulk foods section like Whole Foods.

        Poppy seeds aren't exactly unknown in the US. Does Publix sell them in SoFla?

        Gruß,

        Bryan

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    18. 2 issues. what are Süß Brösel (something Bavarian may be), and how do you get 250gr Vollei. 2 eggs or 4 eggs, 6 eggs how many. I never heard about eggs measured in gr. I would put proper punction and question marks, but I have keyboard confusion.

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    19. Elke,
      Suss Brosel is sweet bread crumbs. Leftover cake is a great option! Each egg is approximately 50g so 250g is about 5 eggs.

      I hope this helps!

      Katie

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    20. somewhere i missed the english transcription... could we please have it again :) thank you SOOO very much :) YUM! :)

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    21. Anonymous: http://bakingthroughgermany.blogspot.de/2011/03/translated-poppy-seed-cake-aka.html
      enjoy!

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    22. Ja. Wo ist die Ubersetzung auf Englisch, por favor (Spanisch auch geht - I'm a bit tipsy, so I'm showing off). I once did a Norwegian woman a big favour when I lived in Spain. We used to speak German together to communicate. She was about to go to Berlin, and instead of imposing any charges for the help that I had given her (I couldn't have even if I'd tried; it would be so coarse), I asked her to bring me a Mohnkuchen instead. That was in about 2003 and I'm still waiting...

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    23. Anonymous: http://bakingthroughgermany.blogspot.de/2011/03/translated-poppy-seed-cake-aka.html
      enjoy!

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    24. I’ve liked interpretation your trainings. It is well printed. It looks like you spend a large quantity of time and effort in script the blog. I am raising your exertion.You can visit my site.Transcriptionist

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    25. PLEASE translate quickly!!! I miss my German backeri items:)

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    26. Was this recipe ever translated into English? Thanks :)

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      Replies
      1. yes it was! http://www.bakingthroughgermany.com/2011/03/translated-poppy-seed-cake-aka.html

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